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How to remove blood from furniture

How to remove blood from furniture

It's no secret that periods can be messy - let's be real here. We've all had a moment where our period has seeped through our clothes and onto our sofa or chair, leaving us feeling embarrassed and in a panic to figure out how to clean it. 

Even though it can be an uncomfortable and embarrassing situation, there's no need to worry, as we're here to teach you how to remove period blood from furniture like a pro! 

Removing blood from furniture

#1: Soap and cold water

First, it's important to remember that period blood is not actually dirty, so you don't need to treat it as such. In fact, you can use regular soap and water to clean it up. Simply wet a cloth with cold water and add a drop or two of soap, then gently dab the area until the blood is removed. If the stain is stubborn, you can try using a stronger cleaning solution, like vinegar or hydrogen peroxide. Just be sure to test it on a small area first to make sure it doesn't damage your furniture.

#2: Salt solution 

If you're looking for a more natural solution, you can also try using salt. Salt is a great absorbent and can help to remove blood quickly. Simply sprinkle a generous amount of a thick salt and water mixture on the stain and let it sit for a few minutes, then clean it up with a cloth. You can also try using a mixture of salt and Borax, which is a natural cleaning agent. Just mix equal parts of each and sprinkle it on the stain, then dab it gently after a few minutes.

#3: remüvie™ Intimate Stain Remover

You can also try our gentle plant based remüvie™ Intimate Stain Remover. It’s fast acting, simple to use and also fragrance free, so you can keep your furniture looking good as new again. 

How to use: Spray remüvie™ directly onto the stain. Leave the foam solution on for a few seconds, and then gently dab the area with a wet cloth. Repeat this a few times to remove the excess water and solution. For stubborn blood stains, you might need to use the product a few times to get the best results. We always recommend patch testing remüvie™ first on any furniture or upholstery.

No matter what method you choose, it's important to act quickly to remove the blood. The longer it sits, the harder it will be to remove. 

remuvie intimate stain remover

Workplace period leaks: The office chair

If you're reading this, then chances are you've been in a similar situation - period blood leaked onto your office chair at work. And, like most people, you're probably feeling a mix of embarrassment, frustration, and panic. Noticing period blood at work… is not exactly the best way to start your day (or week).

Dealing with period leaks at work is just a fact of life. In fact, it's actually no different to having a nosebleed or cutting your finger, so don’t worry. Fortunately, if blood stains do happen, there are a few things you can do to minimise the damage and get your chair back to its pre-leak state.

Removing blood stains from office chairs

First, if you have a spare towel or cloth, place it over the area to absorb the blood. This will help to keep the blood from seeping further into the fabric and will make cleanup a lot easier.

Next, wet a cloth with cold water and add a few drops of soap. Gently dab the area until the blood is removed. For stubborn stains, try using vinegar or hydrogen peroxide as a cleaning solution. Before using it on your chair, make sure you test it on a small area first.

Chances are that you may not be carrying our remüvie™ Intimate Stain Remover with you to use on your office chair, so why not suggest the idea to your employer to stock it as part of the cleaning supplies? Not only will it help other people with period leaks at work, but you’ll also be taking a step toward encouraging a period positive workplace.

You can also find the top tips on surviving a period at work in our previous blog.
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